Interaksyon.com Clarifies Earlier “Double-Edged Sword” Story Errors on MCPIF

Interaksyon.com Clarifies Earlier “Double-Edged Sword” Story Errors on MCPIF

About a week after factual errors in the story were pointed out to them, Interaksyon.com finally issues a clarification.

Filipino journalists will no longer face prosecution for two separate cases should they be accused of libel for articles published in print and online.

This clarification was issued by a group of lawyers and internet freedom advocates after InterAksyon.com cross-posted an article by the Philippine News Agency that said double-jeopardy is likely in the proposed law.

“No journalist who has a controversial article published online and on a … Continue reading »

Netizen Report: Magna Carta Edition

Netizen Report: Magna Carta Edition

Netizen Report: Magna Carta Edition

More international coverage of the MCPIF:

Back in October, we reported that the Congress of the Philippines passed a controversial law named the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. The Act was initially set to become effective on October 3 until its implementation was suspended by the Philippine Supreme Court. Now, thanks to the collective work of lawyers, bloggers, technology experts, and human rights advocates, Philippine Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has proposed a new bill “the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF)” to replace the Cybercrime Prevention Act.

Senator Santiago claims the … Continue reading »

Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) Discusses the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) Discusses the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) Discusses the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Democracy.Net.PH is grateful that Cebu journalists and bloggers are discussing the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF). We hope that more such public discussions will be held, and we welcome the opportunity to discuss the MCPIF with everyone.

To allay the concerns of John Rey Saavedra (The Freeman) and Frank Malilong Jr. (Sun.Star Cebu), we would like to point them to Section 40 of the SBN 3327 as filed, which bars double jeopardy under the MCPIF and the RPC, or for that matter, the … Continue reading »

For Freedom On The Internet

For Freedom On The Internet

For Freedom On The Internet

More on developments on the controversial Anti-Cybercrime bill which has been issued a TRO by the Supreme Court. It is unconstitutional and should be struck down with finality, Senator Miriam Santiago asserts, because of its many questionable provisions. In the meantime, she proposes a new version – SB 3327, the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF), which will still define and penalize cybercrimes. Its primary purpose, however, is to protect the rights and freedoms in cyberspace. It is an important step towards decriminalization, as it treats libel as a civil rather … Continue reading »

Conrado de Quiros: “If you can defend it in the social media, you can defend it anywhere.”

Conrado de Quiros: “If you can defend it in the social media, you can defend it anywhere.”

Conrado de Quiros on the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet freedom in “Law of the law”

Specifically I’m glad she’s done a reboot of the cybercrime law by coming out with “version 2.0.” It doesn’t just take out the kinks in the old software, or law, it overhauls it entirely. It directly addresses the complaint of the netizens—which is, that in the old law’s attempts to curb the loudness of Internet traffic, it threatens to mute it completely. That is … Continue reading »

Magna Carta for Internet Freedom to Replace Anti-Cybercrime Law — Miriam

Magna Carta for Internet Freedom to Replace Anti-Cybercrime Law — Miriam

According to Santiago, her Senate Bill No. 3327, also known as the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF), will protect the rights and freedoms of Filipinos in cyberspace, while defining and penalizing cybercrimes.

“While it is important to crackdown on criminal activities on the internet, protecting constitutional rights like free expression, privacy, and due process should hold a higher place in crafting laws,” she said.

Santiago points out that the MCPIF upholds the freedom of expression of Filipinos in cyberspace, unlike Republic Act No. 10175.

Continue reading »

Senator offers alternative to controversial Anti-Cybercrime Law

Senator offers alternative to controversial Anti-Cybercrime Law

The Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom has gained international attention.

Manila: A measure has been filed in the Senate as an alternative to the controversial Anti-Cybercrime Law, which has caused jitters among cyber-activists due to its perceived restrictive provisions.

Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has filed Senate Bill No 3327, otherwise known as the “Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF)”.

It essentially seeks to provide parameters concerning the use of cyberspace and the internet while containing penal provisions for punishing crimes committed in cyberspace.

The proposed measure is more positively … Continue reading »

‘Anti-cybercrime Law 2.0′ pushed

‘Anti-cybercrime Law 2.0′ pushed

Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago is seeking the passage into law of an “anti-cybercrime law version 2.0” to replace the controversial Republic Act No. 10175.

Santiago says the country needs a more effective cyber law because information and communications technology (ICT) and the Internet are drivers of economic growth. According to a 2012 report by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), the business process outsourcing (BPO) industry, the information technology outsourcing (ITO) industry, and other outsourcing industries, also known as knowledge worker industries, which are strongly dependent on fast and reliable ICT and … Continue reading »

Rappler Newscast | November 30, 2012

Rappler Newscast | November 30, 2012

Senator Miriam Santiago wants the Senate to pass her new version of the anti-cybercrime law.

Santiago says the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom will define and penalize cybercrimes while protecting citizens’ rights.

In October, the Supreme Court stopped the implementation of the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012.

The law drew protest because it allegedly violates freedom of expression.

Santiago says the new version ensures due process in the collection of real-time traffic data, removes the takedown clause, which allows government to block access to a website without a court … Continue reading »