Senator Santiago’s Version of the Anti-Cybercrime Law and Social Media Marketing in the Philippines

Senator Santiago’s Version of the Anti-Cybercrime Law and Social Media Marketing in the Philippines

Senator Santiago’s Version of the Anti-Cybercrime Law and Social Media Marketing in the Philippines

“Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago filed a more positively worded version of the controversial law. She called it the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom. While critics and pundits called it a “mere positive spin on repression,” we think it’s a very intelligent take on a very sensitive issue.

“From the outset, the law ensures and affirms our fundamental freedoms (as outlined in the Constitution) in the brick-and-mortar world and translates them in the genuinely confusing world of the social media in the Philippines. She’s eliminated most … Continue reading »

Freedom to the (online) people!

Freedom to the (online) people!

Freedom to the (online) people!

Senate Bill 3327, the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom, is a more Internet user-friendly alternative to the current law. The “2.0” version ensures due process by providing strict guidelines for data collection, including the need to have warrants. This eliminates the right of the government to conduct warrantless collection real-time traffic data as previously provided, perceived as a form of illegal search and seizure.

Source: http://manilastandardtoday.com/2013/01/23/freedom-to-the-online-people/ Image: Freedom text / Jonathon Colman / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The Wisdom of Crowds: Crowdsourcing Net Freedom

The Wisdom of Crowds: Crowdsourcing Net Freedom

The Wisdom of Crowds: Crowdsourcing Net Freedom

Where the Cybercrime Prevention Act tries to apply the elements of libel to statements made on the Internet, the MCPIF recognizes that the Internet is too complex for a law meant for newspapers.

“The Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom goes beyond the scope of RA 10175 simply because the Cybercrime Prevention Act is inadequate and ill suited to address the challenges of the Information Age.”

Source: http://verafiles.org/the-wisdom-of-crowds-crowdsourcing-net-freedom/ Image: Some rights reserved

Philippines anti-cybercrime law 2.0

Philippines anti-cybercrime law 2.0

Philippines anti-cybercrime law 2.0

The MCFIP is a better anti-cybercrime law on several accounts.

It gives the state the mandate to ensure access to the internet, first and foremost, and protection of citizens’ rights in cyberspace, including economic and consumer rights.

ICT is promoted as a tool for more effective governance and for creating an empowered citizenry.

Modern technology is harnessed for national development and exploited to stimulate the economy and encourage competitiveness.

Law enforcement is equipped with the capability to “prevent, detect, and respond to cybercrime,” as well as to protect critical national ICT infrastructure from … Continue reading »

Interaksyon.com Clarifies Earlier “Double-Edged Sword” Story Errors on MCPIF

Interaksyon.com Clarifies Earlier “Double-Edged Sword” Story Errors on MCPIF

About a week after factual errors in the story were pointed out to them, Interaksyon.com finally issues a clarification.

Filipino journalists will no longer face prosecution for two separate cases should they be accused of libel for articles published in print and online.

This clarification was issued by a group of lawyers and internet freedom advocates after InterAksyon.com cross-posted an article by the Philippine News Agency that said double-jeopardy is likely in the proposed law.

“No journalist who has a controversial article published online and on a … Continue reading »

Netizen Report: Magna Carta Edition

Netizen Report: Magna Carta Edition

Netizen Report: Magna Carta Edition

More international coverage of the MCPIF:

Back in October, we reported that the Congress of the Philippines passed a controversial law named the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. The Act was initially set to become effective on October 3 until its implementation was suspended by the Philippine Supreme Court. Now, thanks to the collective work of lawyers, bloggers, technology experts, and human rights advocates, Philippine Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has proposed a new bill “the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF)” to replace the Cybercrime Prevention Act.

Senator Santiago claims the … Continue reading »

Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) Discusses the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) Discusses the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC) Discusses the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Democracy.Net.PH is grateful that Cebu journalists and bloggers are discussing the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF). We hope that more such public discussions will be held, and we welcome the opportunity to discuss the MCPIF with everyone.

To allay the concerns of John Rey Saavedra (The Freeman) and Frank Malilong Jr. (Sun.Star Cebu), we would like to point them to Section 40 of the SBN 3327 as filed, which bars double jeopardy under the MCPIF and the RPC, or for that matter, the … Continue reading »

For Freedom On The Internet

For Freedom On The Internet

For Freedom On The Internet

More on developments on the controversial Anti-Cybercrime bill which has been issued a TRO by the Supreme Court. It is unconstitutional and should be struck down with finality, Senator Miriam Santiago asserts, because of its many questionable provisions. In the meantime, she proposes a new version – SB 3327, the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF), which will still define and penalize cybercrimes. Its primary purpose, however, is to protect the rights and freedoms in cyberspace. It is an important step towards decriminalization, as it treats libel as a civil rather … Continue reading »

Conrado de Quiros: “If you can defend it in the social media, you can defend it anywhere.”

Conrado de Quiros: “If you can defend it in the social media, you can defend it anywhere.”

Conrado de Quiros on the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet freedom in “Law of the law”

Specifically I’m glad she’s done a reboot of the cybercrime law by coming out with “version 2.0.” It doesn’t just take out the kinks in the old software, or law, it overhauls it entirely. It directly addresses the complaint of the netizens—which is, that in the old law’s attempts to curb the loudness of Internet traffic, it threatens to mute it completely. That is … Continue reading »