Miriam pushes Anti-Cybercrime Law version 2.0

Miriam pushes Anti-Cybercrime Law version 2.0

Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago is pushing for a crowdsourced anti-cybercrime bill version 2.0 that seeks to address the controversies in the previous one.

The senator said the so-called Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF) addresses the issue of cybercrime while also protecting freedom of speech on the Internet. She said this is a direct response to Republic Act No. 10175, which has been halted by the Supreme Court.

“While it is important to crackdown on criminal activities on the internet, protecting constitutional rights like free expression, privacy, and due process … Continue reading »

Miriam proposes new anti-cybercrime law

Miriam proposes new anti-cybercrime law

In a statement on Friday, November 30, Santiago said the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom will define and penalize cybercrimes while protecting rights and freedoms.

“The [Magna Carta] does not suffer from overbreadth and vagueness in its provisions on libel, unlike the law it tries to replace. In fact, it treats libel as a civil liability rather than a criminal act, which is a step forward in the move to decriminalize libel,” Santiago said.

The senator was referring to the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 or Republic Act 10175, which various … Continue reading »

Lawmaker files bill to replace anti-cybercrime law

Lawmaker files bill to replace anti-cybercrime law

Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago has filed a bill that would repeal the contentious provisions of the Anti-Cybercrime Law, which was rejected by various sectors because of its failure to uphold due process and freedom of expression.

Without losing the objective of running after criminals using the Internet, Santiago said the country needs a more effective cyberlaw since information and communications technology (ICT) is a driver of economic growth.

Source: http://www.sunstar.com.ph/breaking-news/2012/11/30/lawmaker-files-bill-replace-anti-cybercrime-law-255952

Has Politics Gone Peer to Peer?

Has Politics Gone Peer to Peer?

Here’s an excerpt of the discussion organized by the MIT Center for Civic Media:

“Stephen responds that democracy has more or less become synonymous with representative democracy. And that’s not how Linux is made. Wikipedia isn’t a bunch of people elected to be elite encyclopedists. Lessig thinks that democracy is too tightly associated with professionals. One of the hardest things in front of us is the need to revise amateur politics: people who are involved because they have a love for service and being citizens. The distinction between professionals and amateurs … Continue reading »

Crowdsourcing: The Story of the Drafting of the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

Crowdsourcing: The Story of the Drafting of the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom

On October 29, 2012, the MCPIF team had a fruitful discussion with the staff of Senator Santiago. The senator’s staff picked up from where the MCPIF team (by then calling themselves Democracy.Net.PH or PHNetDems) left off in the draft; the PHNetDems waited anxiously for a few days for any word, and were pleasantly surprised and not a little awed by the completion and polishing done by the senator’s staff. Final discussions were done via email exchanges, and the next few days were spent … Continue reading »

Rebecca MacKinnon on Internet Freedom

Rebecca MacKinnon on Internet Freedom

In this TED talk, Rebecca MacKinnon calls for a broader and more sustained internet freedom movement. She warns that the apparent borderless character of the Internet is illusory. Borders do persist in cyberspace. In some countries, this is a result of language and culture, in others such as China, this is a result of constraints put up by governments. MacKinnon also notes that, “even in democratic societies today, we do not have the answers for how you balance security and law enforcement on one hand and protection of civil liberties and free speech … Continue reading »

A Magna Carta Moment for Internet Freedom

A Magna Carta Moment for Internet Freedom

Rebecca MacKinnon, whose new book, Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom, was released [February 2012], addressed the issue of Internet freedom at a TED Talk in Edinburgh last year. She spoke of the Internet’s “border busting” potential, as well as how that potential is being stifled by censorship—and not just in the places you would expect.

There is, according to MacKinnon, a “Magna Carta moment” coming when the people will demand that “government and technology serve the world’s people and not the other way around.”

Continue reading »

Magna Carta For Internet Freedom Takes Shape

Magna Carta For Internet Freedom Takes Shape

Credit: Public Domain

Senate Bill 3327, titled “The Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom,” contains an extensive list of provisions detailing the rights of internet users in the country, as well as penalties for violating the charter.

It also contains chapters discussing cybercrime, cyber defence and national cyber security.

Worthy of note was the inclusion of the highly-anticipated implementing rules and regulations that clarifies how the internet will be policed – a key part … Continue reading »

Monday Morning Ramble

Monday Morning Ramble

So the perspective of this bill is infinitely different and much more respective of free expression. The two aspects of the bill that interested me most were: (1) intellectual property rights, and (2) libel provision. Here’s a short interpretation of each section:

Intellectual Property: Any material published on the internet is considered copyrighted when published. The penalty for stealing someone else’s original work is damages plus legal costs. This effectively makes the complainant whole without draconian penalties. Only material cases would end up in court. Nuisance cases would fall to the wayside. The “bias” … Continue reading »